Nicholas Heiman has several years of experience working in Kansas family court, particularly dealing with child support and custody cases. We’re available to help if you and your former spouse or partner can’t reach an agreed upon solution through mediation, or if you simply want to put the best legal foot forward when it comes to your children. At the Heiman Law Office, we will develop a case to increase your chances of being able to see your children as often as possible. Nicholas will fight aggressively for the parental rights you want and deserve.

In Kansas, joint custody is common, but other options are available. In joint custody situations, courts usually assign one parent residential custody, who the children spends the most time with, and the other parent is awarded nights and weekends, as well as certain holidays. The court occasionally awards parents shared physical custody, allowing both parents to have their children stay with them for nearly equal time periods. Courts sometimes split up children, and each parent may take one, for instance. Although this isn’t often seen, it is an option and is referred to as divided custody.

If your spouse is given sole custody, you’ll need to arrange visitation with your child. There will typically be a list of guidelines involved with these access rights to keep the children’s best interests in mind. The guidelines are general, reasonable concepts, such as making sure the children are ready to go on time and avoiding arguments with your former spouse in front of your children. Everything is intended with the children’s best interests in mind. If these rules are not respected, visitation rights can be reassessed or revoked.

When child support is involved, many situations may arise when having a lawyer on your side would be critical. You may feel as though the court has not awarded you enough funds from your spouse, especially as circumstances change over the years. You are entitled to hire a lawyer and reach out to the court if you believe your current compensation is no longer sufficient to raise your child. If you or your spouse have not paid child support, this is a felony and will be handled as an extremely serious offense. Wages will be withheld at first, and jail time will follow if not corrected.